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The Role of Comforting Support & Practical Support

When someone is going through a difficult time, they need all the support they can get. This support can come in two forms: comforting support and practical support.

Comforting support is about providing emotional comfort and understanding. It can involve listening to the person’s story, offering words of encouragement, or simply being there for them. Comforting support can help the person to feel less alone and to cope with their emotions.

There are many ways to provide comforting support. Here are a few examples:

  • Listen without judgment. When someone is going through a difficult time, they need someone to listen to them without judgment. This means being there for them and letting them talk about their feelings, even if you don’t understand them.
  • Offer words of encouragement. Let the person know that you believe in them and that they can get through this. This can be as simple as saying something like, “I’m here for you” or “You’re strong, you can do this.”
  • Let them know that you care. Let the person know that you care about them and that you’re thinking of them. This can be done through words, actions, or simply being present.
  • Share your own experiences. If you have been through something similar, you can share your experiences with the person. This can help them to feel less alone and to know that they’re not the only one who has gone through this.
  • Provide a shoulder to cry on. Sometimes, the best thing you can do is to simply be there for the person and let them cry. This can help them to release their emotions and to feel better.

Practical support is about providing help with the practical aspects of life. This can involve things like cooking meals, running errands, or taking care of children. Practical support can help the person to focus on their recovery and to not have to worry about the day-to-day tasks.

There are many ways to provide practical support. Here are a few examples:

  • Cook meals. If the person is unable to cook for themselves, you can offer to cook meals for them. This can be a simple task that can make a big difference.
  • Run errands. If the person needs help running errands, such as grocery shopping or picking up prescriptions, you can offer to do it for them. This can free up their time so they can focus on other things.
  • Take care of children. If the person has children, you can offer to take care of them for a few hours or a day. This can give the person a break and allow them to focus on themselves.
  • Help with household chores. If the person is unable to do their own household chores, you can offer to help them. This can include things like laundry, dishes, or cleaning.
  • Drive the person to appointments. If the person has medical appointments or other appointments, you can offer to drive them. This can help them to get to their appointments on time and to avoid having to worry about transportation.
  • Provide financial assistance. If the person is struggling financially, you can offer to provide financial assistance. This could involve helping them to pay bills, buy groceries, or cover other expenses.

It is important to note that not everyone will need both comforting support and practical support. Some people may only need one type of support, while others may need both. The best way to determine what type of support someone needs is to ask them.

If you are supporting someone who is going through a difficult time, it is important to be flexible and to offer the type of support that they need the most. Sometimes, the person may just need someone to listen to them. Other times, they may need help with practical tasks. It is also important to be patient and understanding. The person may not always be in the mood to talk or to accept help. Just being there for them is often enough.

If you are unsure how to support someone, you can ask them what they need. You can also offer to help them find resources in their community. There are many organisations that provide support to people who are going through difficult times.

Remember, the most important thing is to offer your support and to let the person know that you care.

If you’d like to hear more, check out our podcast, Death Defined (https://deathdefined.com.au/Video/) where we discuss the complicated emotional spectrum of death with real people, from their experiences. Hosted by funeral director Matt Kwoka, we delve into the complicated emotions, processes, and taboos surrounding one of the experiences that unites all humanity.

 

If you’d like to discuss requirements for a funeral, you can contact us at Southern Cross Funerals.

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